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Do Discounts Reduce Service? April 11, 2012

Posted by trainingsolutionshlc in Uncategorized.
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When we give a lower price to someone or do someone a favor do we give less to them than to full paying customers?

 

I recently heard a professional tell a client I’m doing this for you because your friend asked me.  That means you are on the bottom of the list and I will get to you when I can.  Wow! Talk about harsh.

 

Maybe we don’t say the words out loud but do we act that way?  I remember an associate in a government supported program who told a client you are entitled to free service but if you want my full package you have to pay me.  I don’t get paid enough in this program to give you 100%.  I heard that story from the client when I worked with them and who later recommended me to a colleague at my full rate.  Yes, I am grateful for that.

 

Bottom line is we never know who knows whom.  It’s similar to networking.  People talk.  I know big surprise.  They tell friends and colleagues about programs and support they receive along with resources.  They will talk about you; good or bad.  Don’t you want the positive recommendations to be there?

 

If you don’t want to help someone say so up front.  Tell them how booked you are and maybe give an hour of time to guide them or refer them to someone who might be able to help them more but never ever give less than your best.  Believe it will come back to haunt you.

Comments»

1. Steve Weed - May 1, 2012

Harriet,
Just a visceral response without viewing the video: If you want repeat business, you better give ’em your best service.

When you have a client’s attention, that is the time to impress them.

The obvious caveat it that if the people you attract with a price appeal have no appreciation for quality, you are wasting your time.

I have done retail where a coupon brings in a few people I could convert based on service. My company in a consulting based sales approach. I tried creating a product based on a budget appeal with limited client interaction. WRONG. Few people were attracted because there is always someone cheaper. The projects that came our way fell into one of two buckets:
– WOW…you can do that too? As a result, we upsold the basic package.
– What about this? What about that? In other words, we spent too much time educating clients and were all too eager to end the engagement.

Now if you are selling cornflakes or car washes, part of the purchase decision is what’s on sale. But you still better have a good box of cereal or a well staff car wash.

trainingsolutionshlc - May 1, 2012

Good insight thank you


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